Course specification and structure
Undergraduate Course Structures Postgraduate Course Structures

UDCMPSCI - BSc Computer Science

Course Specification


Validation status Validated
Highest award Bachelor of Science Level Honours
Possible interim awards Bachelor of Science, Diploma of Higher Education, Certificate of Higher Education, Bachelor of Science
Total credits for course 360
Awarding institution London Metropolitan University
Teaching institutions London Metropolitan University
School School of Computing and Digital Media
Subject Area Computer Science and Applied Computing
Attendance options
Option Minimum duration Maximum duration
Full-time 3 YEARS  
Part-time 4 YEARS 6 YEARS
Course leader Quan Dang

About the course and its strategy towards teaching and learning and towards blended learning/e-learning

This degree is specifically designed for those students who wish to specialise in the design and implementation of modern software systems. The course fosters development using a range of tools and development platforms and encourages students to critically evaluate the role of computer-based systems in a variety of contexts. Emphasis throughout is on what the student learns and is able to do as a result of the learning.

This course will teach you everything you need for a successful career in IT– from programming and information systems to mobile applications and artificial intelligence. Students will attend a variety of scheduled sessions, such as lectures, tutorials and workshops. It is expected that they will study module materials and continue to work on exercises and coursework outside the scheduled learning and teaching hours.

Appropriate blended learning technologies, such as the University’s virtual learning environment WebLearn, Library’s e-books and Online Databases, are used to facilitate and support student learning, in particular to:
• deliver content;
• encourage active learning;
• provide formative and summative assessments with prompt feedback;
• enhance student engagement and learning.

Course aims

Course aims are broad statements of intent and should be written to show how the content of the course meets the aims. Where a course sits within a framework the course aims should incorporate framework aims.

The aims of this course include:
• To provide an education in the development and use of software that will equip students with intellectual, practical and problem-solving skills;
• To provide graduates with transferable skills to enable progression in either management or technical areas, with the ability to master new developments and have flexibility in career structure in an era of rapid organisational change and technological innovation;
• To equip graduates with the necessary ability and study skills to progress to advanced postgraduate courses of study;
• To provide industry, commerce and research laboratories with the effective and adaptive computer scientists that society demands.

Course learning outcomes

Learning outcomes are statements of what a student is expected to understand or to be able to do after completing the process of learning. Detail both the knowledge and the skills that the student should have developed by the end of the course.

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

LO1. Demonstrate an understanding of the main principles of computer science;
LO2. Apply analytical and design techniques to solution of problems in computer science;
LO3. Develop and use software applications and tools across a range of platforms;
LO4. Use self-evaluation;
LO5. Work effectively as a member of a team;
LO6. Demonstrate an awareness of the importance of legal, social, ethical and professional issues underpinning the IT discipline;
LO7. Research, plan, structure and deliver an academic report and presentation;
LO8. Demonstrate an understanding of the personal qualities, skills and qualifications needed for employment in a range of roles and organisations.

Course learning outcomes / Module cross reference

Module Title Module Code


Computer Hardware & Software Architectures CT4005
Logic and Mathematical Techniques MA4005
Programming CS4001
Introduction to Information Systems CC4057
Fundamentals of Computing CS4051
Networks & Operating Systems CS5001
Software Engineering CS5002
Data Structures and Specialist Programming CS5003
Databases CC5051
Professional Issues, Ethics and Computer Law CS5052
Project CS6P05
Formal Specification & Software Implementation CS6001
Distributed and Internet Systems CS6002
Work Related Learning II FC6W51
Creating a Winning Business MN6W50
Mobile Applications CS6051

Learning Outcomes 1 - 8

Principle QAA benchmark statements

Benchmark standards are defined at threshold and typical levels and some further comments are made about excellence.

Threshold level

The threshold level is interpreted to mean that all students (taken over all years), graduating with an honours degree in the discipline of computing will have achieved this level of performance.

On graduating with an honours degree in computing, students should be able to:
• demonstrate a requisite understanding of the main body of knowledge for their programme of study
• understand and apply essential concepts, principles and practice of the subject in the context of well-defined scenarios, showing judgement in the selection and application of tools and techniques
• produce work involving problem identification, the analysis, the design or the development of a system with appropriate documentation, recognising the important relationships between these. The work will show some problem-solving and evaluation skills drawing on some supporting evidence, and demonstrate a requisite understanding of the need for quality
• demonstrate transferable skills and an ability to work under guidance and as a team member
• identify appropriate practices within a professional, legal and ethical framework and understand the need for continuing professional development
• discuss applications based upon the body of knowledge.

Typical level

This is the average standard attained (taken over all years) of all the students graduating with an honours degree in the discipline of computing.

On graduating with an honours degree in computing, students should be able to:
• demonstrate a sound understanding of the main areas of the body of knowledge within their programme of study, with an ability to exercise critical judgement across a range of issues
• critically analyse and apply a range of concepts, principles and practice of the subject in an appropriate manner in the context of loosely defined scenarios, showing effective judgement in the selection and use of tools and techniques
• produce work involving problem identification, the analysis, the design or the development of a system, with accompanying documentation, recognising the important relationships between these. The work will show problem-solving and evaluation skills, draw upon supporting evidence and demonstrate a good understanding of the need for quality
• demonstrate transferable skills with an ability to show organised work as an individual and as a team member and with minimum guidance
• apply appropriate practices within a professional, legal and ethical framework and identify mechanisms for continuing professional development and lifelong learning
• explain a wide range of applications based upon the body of knowledge.

Excellence

While the benchmark standards above are defined for just threshold and typical levels, it is nevertheless expected that programmes in computing will provide opportunities for students of the highest calibre to achieve their full potential.

Such students will be:
• creative and innovative in their application of the principles covered in the curriculum, and may relish the opportunity to engage in entrepreneurial activity
• able to contribute significantly to the analysis, design or the development of systems which are complex, and fit for purpose, recognising the important relationships between these
• able to exercise critical evaluation and review of both their own work and the work of others.

In as much as human ingenuity and creativity has fostered the rapid development of the discipline of computing in the past, programmes in computing should not limit those who will lead the development of the discipline in the future.

Assessment strategy

Students are provided with opportunities to develop an understanding of, and the necessary skills to demonstrate, good academic practice. Particularly, students will be encouraged to complete weekly tutorial and workshop exercises as well as periodic formative diagnostic tests to enhance their learning. During tutorial and workshop sessions students will receive ongoing support and feedback on their work to promote engagement and provide the basis for tackling the summative assessments.
A range of assessment methods is employed throughout the course. Module assessment typically consists of a combination of assessment instruments including courseworks, in-class tests and exams. Coursework can include an artefact such as a website, a database or program code in addition to a written report/essay. The volume, timing and nature of assessment enable students to demonstrate the extent to which they have achieved the intended learning outcomes.
Formative and summative feedback will be provided using a variety of methods and approaches, such as learning technologies, one to one and group presentation of the submitted work, at various points throughout the teaching period and will adhere to University policy regarding the timing of feedback.

Organised work experience, work based learning, sandwich year or year abroad

There is an optional 15-credit Level 6 module on Work Related Learning. The School of Computing and Digital Media's World of Work (WOW) Agency offers opportunities to enhance employability skills, gain real experience and 'earn while you learn' through placements into real client-driven projects - working with business and industry.

Course specific regulations

British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation is awarded according to the following additional course regulation:

The project must be passed in order for a student to obtain BSc (Hons) Computer Science.

The project must be passed without compensation.

Modules required for interim awards

Level 4:
Computer Hardware & Software Architectures
Logic and Mathematical Techniques
Programming
Information Systems
Fundamentals of Computing

Level 5:
Networks & Operating Systems
Software Engineering
Data Structures and Specialist Programming
Databases
Professional Issues, Ethics and Computer Law

Level 6:
Project
Formal Specification & Software Implementation
Distributed and Internet Systems
Mobile Applications
Work Related Learning II

Arrangements for promoting reflective learning and personal development

Benchmark standards are defined at threshold and typical levels and some further comments are made about excellence.

Threshold level

The threshold level is interpreted to mean that all students (taken over all years), graduating with an honours degree in the discipline of computing will have achieved this level of performance.

On graduating with an honours degree in computing, students should be able to:
• demonstrate a requisite understanding of the main body of knowledge for their programme of study
• understand and apply essential concepts, principles and practice of the subject in the context of well-defined scenarios, showing judgement in the selection and application of tools and techniques
• produce work involving problem identification, the analysis, the design or the development of a system with appropriate documentation, recognising the important relationships between these. The work will show some problem-solving and evaluation skills drawing on some supporting evidence, and demonstrate a requisite understanding of the need for quality
• demonstrate transferable skills and an ability to work under guidance and as a team member
• identify appropriate practices within a professional, legal and ethical framework and understand the need for continuing professional development
• discuss applications based upon the body of knowledge.

Typical level

This is the average standard attained (taken over all years) of all the students graduating with an honours degree in the discipline of computing.

On graduating with an honours degree in computing, students should be able to:
• demonstrate a sound understanding of the main areas of the body of knowledge within their programme of study, with an ability to exercise critical judgement across a range of issues
• critically analyse and apply a range of concepts, principles and practice of the subject in an appropriate manner in the context of loosely defined scenarios, showing effective judgement in the selection and use of tools and techniques
• produce work involving problem identification, the analysis, the design or the development of a system, with accompanying documentation, recognising the important relationships between these. The work will show problem-solving and evaluation skills, draw upon supporting evidence and demonstrate a good understanding of the need for quality
• demonstrate transferable skills with an ability to show organised work as an individual and as a team member and with minimum guidance
• apply appropriate practices within a professional, legal and ethical framework and identify mechanisms for continuing professional development and lifelong learning
• explain a wide range of applications based upon the body of knowledge.

Excellence

While the benchmark standards above are defined for just threshold and typical levels, it is nevertheless expected that programmes in computing will provide opportunities for students of the highest calibre to achieve their full potential.

Such students will be:
• creative and innovative in their application of the principles covered in the curriculum, and may relish the opportunity to engage in entrepreneurial activity
• able to contribute significantly to the analysis, design or the development of systems which are complex, and fit for purpose, recognising the important relationships between these
• able to exercise critical evaluation and review of both their own work and the work of others.

In as much as human ingenuity and creativity has fostered the rapid development of the discipline of computing in the past, programmes in computing should not limit those who will lead the development of the discipline in the future.

Career, employability and opportunities for continuing professional development

The university careers service offers guidance to students on a one-to-one basis or in group sessions. Various career events are run during the academic year, particularly in the dedicated Employability week, giving students the opportunity to gain knowledge from computing and IT industry speakers.

In the module on Professional Issues, Ethics and Computer Law, students learn about job searches, CV writing, job interviews and aptitude tests.

Graduates gain employment in software houses and in the financial, industrial and service sectors. A number of examples are shown below:-

Digital developer, Skyworks at Sky, London
Chief Technology Officer and Integration Architect, Code Corner
Software Engineer, Intel
Network Engineer, LifelineIT
Mobile Programmer, Lloyds TSB
Web Designer, XFace
Software Engineer, Logica
PHP Developer, New Brand Vision
Specialist Information Systems Engineer, Health Protection Agency
Java Developer, Curo Compensation Ltd
SharePoint Consultant, IMGROUP

Graduates can also pursue careers in research and development in scientific areas of computing.

Professional Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) accreditations & exemptions

This course is accredited as fully meeting the educational requirement for Chartered IT Professional (CITP) registration.

Career opportunities

On successful completion of the course, you’ll have the skills, knowledge and qualifications to gain employment in a range of roles in the IT and technology industry. For example, you could follow in the footsteps of past graduates and pursue a career working in one of many major software houses or gain employment in the financial, industrial and service sectors.

Alternatively, you could work in research and development in scientific areas of computing or utilise your creative and technical skills to work as a technical writer in the IT and technology field.

Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum grade C in three A levels (or a minimum of 96 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Progression Diploma or Access to Higher Education Diploma of 60 Credits)
  • English language and Mathematics GCSEs at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered.

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Computing Extended degree.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Official use and codes

Approved to run from 2013/14 Specification version 1 Specification status Validated
Original validation date 01 Sep 2013 Last validation date 01 Sep 2013  
Sources of funding HE FUNDING COUNCIL FOR ENGLAND
JACS codes I100 (Computer Science): 100%
Route code CMPSCI

Course Structure

Stage 1 Level 04 September start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
CC4057 Introduction to Information Systems Core 15 NORTH AUT TUE AM
CS4001 Programming Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR TUE PM
CS4051 Fundamentals of Computing Core 15 NORTH SPR TUE AM
CT4005 Computer Hardware and Software Architectures Core 30 NORTH SPR+SUM    
          NORTH AUT+SPR MON PM
MA4005 Logic and Mathematical Techniques Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR THU AM

Stage 1 Level 04 January start Not currently offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
CC4057 Introduction to Information Systems Core 15        
CS4001 Programming Core 30        
CS4051 Fundamentals of Computing Core 15        
CT4005 Computer Hardware and Software Architectures Core 30        
MA4005 Logic and Mathematical Techniques Core 30        

Stage 2 Level 05 September start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
CC5051 Databases Core 15 NORTH AUT WED AM
CS5001 Networks and Operating Systems Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR FRI AM
CS5002 Software Engineering Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR FRI PM
CS5003 Data Structures and Specialist Programming Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR TUE PM
CS5052 Professional Issues, Ethics and Computer Law Core 15 NORTH SPR THU PM

Stage 3 Level 06 September start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
CS6001 Formal Specification & Software Implementation Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR WED AM
CS6002 Distributed and Internet Systems Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR MON AM
CS6051 Mobile Applications Core 15 NORTH SPR THU PM
CS6P05 Project Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR WED PM
FC6W51 Work Related Learning II Alt Core 15 NORTH SPR WED PM
          NORTH AUT WED PM
MN6W50 Creating a Winning Business 2 Alt Core 15 CITY SPR WED PM
          CITY AUT WED PM