Course specification and structure
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PMPCODIP - MA Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy

Course Specification


Validation status Validated
Highest award Master of Arts Level Masters
Possible interim awards Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
Total credits for course 180
Awarding institution London Metropolitan University
Teaching institutions London Metropolitan University
School School of Social Sciences
Subject Area Politics and International Relations
Attendance options
Option Minimum duration Maximum duration
Full-time 1 YEARS  
Part-time 2 YEARS 3 YEARS
Course leader  

About the course and its strategy towards teaching and learning and towards blended learning/e-learning

This course focuses on providing students with a firm grasp of the key issues relevant to both the study and practice of peace work, conflict resolution and diplomacy. It does so by offering an integrated programme that analyses debates about the nature of international conflict; examines key instances of intra- and inter- state conflicts; and explores the logic, operation and effectiveness of different approaches to their management and resolution. It seeks to engage with a wide range of contemporary themes and issues (including the proliferation of WMDs, the problem of ‘terrorism’, and the roles of factors such as religious and nationalist tensions, the environment and globalization in modern conflicts). It will also examine the differential impact conflicts have upon diverse groups (for example, in terms of the categories of race, gender and sexuality), and aim to adopt a global view that encompasses both Western and non-Western perspectives.

Its most distinctive aspect is the close integration of academic and practitioner perspectives. Students will be equipped with both the theoretical and conceptual tools to understand the nature of conflict and practical experience of the key techniques deployed to resolve them. To provide this combination of academic and practical knowledge, the expertise of full-time academic staff will be supplemented by that of experienced conflict resolution practitioners. The exploration and training in conflict resolution techniques will be conducted through day-long sessions in the core modules, 'Applied Conflict Transformation' and 'The Practice of Diplomacy'.

The course boasts many pedagogical innovations, such as active learning and practical exercises in the classroom. Since the programme is practically oriented, there will be opportunities for students to learn from and engage with practitioners and to experience the nature of conflict resolution through simulations and role-play exercises.

The more traditional approaches include a mixture of lecture- and seminar- style teaching, within which a combination of whole group, small group, and student-led and tutor-led teaching occurs. This includes face-to-face teaching and discussion, but there is also widespread use of blended learning. Considerable use is made of online learning materials and resources, placed on relevant module Weblearn sites, e.g. lecture notes, module handbooks, readings, video links, recorded lectures, podcasts and blogs. A growing number of materials is also available online through the university library, including access to journals and ebooks. This is all designed to open up the learning space for students to enable them to access the degree 24/7, improving the student learning experience, whilst increasing cost-effectiveness and efficiency.

At the heart of the course is an inclusive curriculum which seeks to relate to, and interact with, the diverse experiences and knowledge-bases of its students. It does this by, for example, adopting a global focus, examining multiples views of the subjects taught, exploring the differential impact of issues on different socio-cultural groups, making material as accessible as possible, offering a wide variety of assessment types, and incorporating student choice and personalization in assessments.

An additional, and important part of the teaching and learning strategy, is the academic research which is conducted by staff in the Politics and International Relations subject group. This is used to support teaching through the transferring of staff research skills and knowledge to enhance the student learning experience.

Course aims

The course aims to provide students with a broad perspective on the theoretical, historical, political and economic aspects of peace, conflict and diplomacy. In particular, the course aims to:

• Ensure that students acquire in-depth knowledge and understanding in the areas of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy
• Enable students to understand and use the concepts, approaches and key research methodologies of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy
• Develop students’ capacities to think critically about events, ideas and institutions
• Encourage students to relate the academic study of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy to real-world conflicts and international affairs more widely
• Allow students to develop key practical skills in the areas of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy such as negotiation, mediation and diplomatic skills
• Enhance students’ employability skills and opportunities for working in the areas of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy
• Provide a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of academic inquiry and debate
• Provide an inclusive curriculum that offers equal opportunities to all students

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

1. Advance their knowledge and understanding of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy, and to develop new skills to a high level
2. Apply established methods and techniques of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy to their own research
3. Apply knowledge with originality, based on a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy
4. Evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy
5. Evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses
6. Exercise self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level
7. Utilize the practical methods and strategies of Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy
8. Exercise initiative and personal responsibility, including decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations
9. Learn independently for the purposes of continuing professional development

Course learning outcomes / Module cross reference

Module Title Module Code LO 1 LO 2 LO 3 LO 4 LO 5 LO 6 LO 7 LO 8 LO 9

Applied Conflict Transformation GI7036 x x x x x x x x x
The Practice of Diplomacy GI7037 x x x x x x x x x
International Conflict Resolution GI7064 x x x x x x x x x
Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy Dissertation GI7P03 x x x x x x x x x
Religion and International Relations GI7076 x x x x x
Human Rights and the International Order GI7010 x x x x x
Security Studies GI7069 x x x x x
International Law and International Order GI7012 x x x x x
Human Security GI7073 x x x x x
History and Theory of Human Rights GI7002 x x x x x
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism SS7143 x x x x x
Explaining Violence SS7170 x x x x x

Assessment strategy

Students are assessed by a mix of methods, including essays, unseen examinations, presentations, reports, case studies, reflective portfolios and a 15,000 word dissertation. A diversity of assessment is regarded as intrinsically desirable, testing and developing different skills and abilities, including research, analytical, communication, practical, team-work and employability-related skills. Many components – e.g. case studies and the dissertation – give students a large degree of flexibility in designing and researching their own projects, choosing their own topics and utilising methods and approaches of their own devising.

Modules required for interim awards

For Masters award – see para 22
PG Diploma – all class-taught core modules plus two optional modules
PG Certificate – three modules, not including elective, of which at least two must be core

Arrangements for promoting reflective learning and personal development

The course is designed to enable students to adopt a critical approach to knowledge and understanding whereby ideas are examined in a reflective manner, which also seeks to promote linkages between the various modules; for example, in relating theory to practice. Reflective learning will be encouraged both in class-based activities and assessment. For example, presentations and simulations will involve in-class feedback and reflection, while feedback on written assessments and follow-up feedback from module leaders will facilitate reflective learning both in and outside the classroom. Students will be encouraged to engage positively with all feedback opportunities, and to reflect and learn from these, resulting in the development of further learning strategies. With the strong practical orientation of the course, students will also be encouraged to reflect upon and develop their personal skills in wider social, cultural and employability senses.

Career, employability and opportunities for continuing professional development

This is a valuable course for those planning careers, or wishing to enhance existing ones, in the government sector, international organizations (like the EU and the UN) or Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) operating in the spheres of peace, conflict and diplomacy. Career paths include working as conflict resolution experts (in areas like mediation and human rights promotion), aid workers, diplomats, civil servants, journalists, and social researchers. Further postgraduate study and research is another pathway opened up by this course.

Career opportunities

We ensure you’re prepared for a range of roles in conflict resolution. Successful graduates could go on to become mediation or conflict resolution practitioners, aid workers or conflict reporters, or work in foreign offices, embassies, the diplomatic services or for international bodies such as the UN.

You’ll also be prepared for further academic study and research in peace and conflict resolution, or other related fields such as politics and international relations.

Entry requirements

You will be required to have:

  • a minimum of a lower second class (2.2) honours degree in a relevant discipline such as politics, international relations, international development, or social and behavioural sciences (applications are also welcome from those who have experience in conflict resolution or who possess relevant professional qualifications)

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Official use and codes

Approved to run from 2019/20 Specification version 1 Specification status Validated
Original validation date 19 Jun 2019 Last validation date 19 Jun 2019  
Sources of funding HE FUNDING COUNCIL FOR ENGLAND
JACS codes
Route code PCODIP

Course Structure

Stage 1 Level 07 September start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
GI7036 Applied Conflict Transformation Core 20 NORTH SPR    
GI7037 The Practice of Diplomacy Core 20 NORTH AUT WED PM
GI7064 International Conflict Resolution Core 20 NORTH AUT MON PM
GI7P03 Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy Dissertation Core 60 NORTH AUT MON EV
          NORTH SPR MON EV
GI7002 History and Theory of Human Rights Option 20 NORTH AUT TUE EV
GI7010 Human Rights and the International Order Option 20 NORTH SPR MON EV
GI7012 International Law and International Order Option 20 NORTH SPR WED EV
GI7069 Security Studies Option 20 NORTH AUT MON AM
GI7073 Human Security Option 20 NORTH SPR WED PM
GI7076 Religion and International Relations Option 20 NORTH AUT TUE PM
SS7143 Terrorism and Counter Terrorism Option 20 NORTH SPR TUE AM
SS7170 Explaining Violence Option 20 NORTH AUT WED AM

Stage 1 Level 07 January start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
GI7036 Applied Conflict Transformation Core 20 NORTH SPR    
GI7037 The Practice of Diplomacy Core 20        
GI7064 International Conflict Resolution Core 20        
GI7P03 Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy Dissertation Core 60 NORTH SPR MON EV
GI7002 History and Theory of Human Rights Option 20        
GI7010 Human Rights and the International Order Option 20 NORTH SPR MON EV
GI7012 International Law and International Order Option 20 NORTH SPR WED EV
GI7069 Security Studies Option 20        
GI7073 Human Security Option 20 NORTH SPR WED PM
GI7076 Religion and International Relations Option 20        
SS7143 Terrorism and Counter Terrorism Option 20 NORTH SPR TUE AM
SS7170 Explaining Violence Option 20