Course specification and structure
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UDDIFOCS - BSc Digital Forensics and Cyber Security

Course Specification


Validation status Validated
Highest award Bachelor of Science Level Honours
Possible interim awards Bachelor of Science, Diploma of Higher Education, Certificate of Higher Education, Bachelor of Science
Total credits for course 360
Awarding institution London Metropolitan University
Teaching institutions London Metropolitan University
School School of Computing and Digital Media
Subject Area Computer Science and Applied Computing
Attendance options
Option Minimum duration Maximum duration
Full-time 3 YEARS  
Part-time 4 YEARS  
Course leader  

About the course and its strategy towards teaching and learning

This course is designed to meet the new and rapidly growing demand for the professionals in Digital Forensics and Cyber Security. It’s designed in particular for those who wish to specialise in the protection against and detection and conviction of digital crimes. Successful completion of this course offers improved career opportunities in law enforcement, government or other related agencies, and commercial IT departments or security consultancies. This course is also an excellent preparation for further research or studies such as MSc or PhD.

Appropriate blended learning approaches and technologies, such as, the University’s VLE and the digital forensics and network security toolkits will be used to facilitate and support student learning, in particular, to:

  • deliver course content;
  • encourage active learning;
  • provide formative and summative assessments, and prompt feedback;
  • enhance student engagement and learning experience.


In this course, students are also provided with the study towards the certification of CompTIA Security +, an international, vendor-neutral certification that demonstrates competency in:

  • Network security
  • Compliance and operational security
  • Threats and vulnerabilities
  • Application, data and host security
  • Access control and identity management
  • Cryptography

Course aims

The primary aim of this course is to provide a broad, general education in the theory and practice of computing with special emphasis in the subject field of digital forensics and cyber security. It also covers the underlying computing principles of programming, problem-solving, communication networks and information systems, and as such has much in common with other courses in our Computing course portfolio. Three major themes are therefore characterised by the course: Digital Forensics, Cyber Security, and Computing.

The general aims of the course are:

  • to prepare students for careers in digital forensics and/or cyber security
  • to develop students skill’s in problem-solving, communication and other transferable skills applicable to a variety of careers
  • to prepare students in study for higher degrees in related subjects
  • to continue the development of those general study skills that will enable students to become independent and lifelong learners

The specific aims of the course are:

  • to develop student’s knowledge of computer hardware and software systems
  • to provide students with a solid background in the theoretical and practical aspects of Digital Forensics
  • to develop student’s understanding of the key issues in preservation of information confidentiality, integrity, and availability
  • to introduce the professional, legal and ethics issues in digital forensics and cyber security

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to
LO 1. demonstrate a requisite understanding of the main body of knowledge in Computing;
LO 2. understand and apply essential concepts, principles and practice in the context of well defined scenarios, showing judgment in the selection and application of tools and techniques to solve the issues with digital forensics and cyber security;
LO 3. produce work involving identification, analysis, design and development of an digital forensics and cyber security system with appropriate documentation. The work will show problem solving and evaluation skills drawing on supporting evidence, and demonstrate a requisite understanding of the need for quality;
LO 4. demonstrate transferable skills and an ability to work under guidance and as an digital forensics and/or cyber security team member;
LO 5. identify appropriate practices within professional and ethical framework of digital forensics and cyber security and understand the need for continuing professional development in this profession;
LO 6. discuss digital forensics and cyber security practices/measures based upon the body of knowledge learned from this course.

Principle QAA benchmark statements

Benchmarking standards are defined at threshold and modal:
1. Threshold
This is interpreted to mean that all students (taken over all years) graduating with an honours degree in the discipline of Computing will have achieved this. Students who reach this will be characterised by being able to:

  • demonstrate a requisite understanding of the main body of knowledge for their programme of study;
  • understand and apply essential concepts, principles and practice of the subject in the context of well defined scenarios, showing judgment in the selection and application of tools and techniques;
  • produce work involving problem identification, the analysis, the design and the development of a system with appropriate documentation. The work will show some problem solving and evaluation skills drawing on some supporting evidence, and demonstrate a requisite understanding of the need for quality;
  • demonstrate transferable skills and an ability to work under guidance and as a team member;
  • identify appropriate practices within a professional and ethical framework and understand the need for continuing professional development;
  • discuss applications based upon the body of knowledge.

2. Modal
This is the average (taken over all years) of all the students graduating with an honours degree in the discipline of digital forensics and cyber security. Students reaching this will be able to:

  • demonstrate a sound understanding of the main areas of the body of knowledge within their programme of study, with an ability to exercise critical judgment across a range of issues;
  • critically analyse and apply a range of concepts, principles and practice of the subject in an appropriate manner in the context of loosely defined scenarios, showing effective judgment in the selection and use of tools and techniques;
  • produce work involving problem identification, the analysis, the design and the development of a system, with accompanying documentation. The work will show problem solving and evaluation skills, draw upon supporting evidence and demonstrate a good understanding of the need for quality;
  • demonstrate transferable skills with an ability to show organised work as an individual and as a team member and with minimum guidance;
  • apply appropriate practices within a professional and ethical framework and identify mechanisms for continuing professional development and life long learning;
  • explain a wide range of applications based upon the body of knowledge.

Assessment strategy

A range of assessment methods is employed throughout the course. The method of assessment for each module in each level is clearly described in the individual ‘Module Guide’ which is made available to the students at the start of the semester. Modules employ a combination of the following forms of assessments:

  • Case study reports and presentations
  • Laboratory workbooks
  • Laboratory logbooks
  • Unseen examinations
  • Part seen examinations
  • Individual vivas

Organised work experience, work based learning, sandwich year or year abroad

There is a module, “FC6W51 Work Related Learning”, embedded at level 6. Students must take this module to obtain work related experience.

Modules required for interim awards

All modules are core-compulsory except one autumn&15-credit&designate module at level six.

Arrangements for promoting reflective learning and personal development

Appropriate blended learning approaches and technologies, such as, the University’s VLE and the digital forensics and network security toolkits will be used to facilitate and support student learning, in particular, to:

  • deliver course content;
  • encourage active learning;
  • provide formative and summative assessments, and prompt feedback;
  • enhance student engagement and learning experience.

A process of personal development planning takes place throughout the course to help students to think about and make sense of what is being learnt and why, plan ahead and relate to what has been learned and their own future.

Arrangements on the course for careers education, information and guidance

The university careers service offers guidance to students on a one-to-one basis or in group sessions. SEW (Student Enterprise Workshops) are run during the academic year, giving students the opportunity to gain knowledge from computing and IT industry speakers.

Other external links providing expertise and experience

There will be invited speeches and seminars with experts from Metropolitan Police force, IT Security companies, and digital investigative companies. Opportunities exist for students to carry out their final year projects through external links.

Students are able to gain work experience through WOW (World of Work) Agency projects. SEW (Student Enterprise Workshops) are run during the academic year, giving students the opportunity to gain knowledge from computing and IT industry speakers.

Through this course, students are also provided with the study towards the external certification of CompTIA Security +, an international, vendor-neutral certification that demonstrates competency in:

  • Network security
  • Compliance and operational security
  • Threats and vulnerabilities
  • Application, data and host security
  • Access control and identity management
  • Cryptography

Professional Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) accreditations & exemptions

This course is accredited as fully meeting the educational requirement for Chartered IT Professional (CITP) registration.

On graduation, you'll be eligible to apply for Membership of the British Computer Society (MBCS).

Career opportunities

You’ll complete this course ready to pursue a career in computer forensics and/or IT security, or in the wider IT industry. Previous graduates have gone on to find employment as data analysts at companies such as MWR InfoSecurity.

Potential employers include digital crime investigation companies, government agencies and the police force, as well as national and international organisations that need protection against digital crime.

Throughout the course, you’ll have the opportunity to attend regular student enterprise workshops, where you’ll have the chance to network with potential employers. You’ll also be able to gain valuable work experience through our optional work placement module, and through our World of Work agency.

This course is also an excellent preparation for further research or studies such as MSc or PhD either at London Met or another university.

Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum grades CCD in three A levels, one of which must be from a relevant subject (or a minimum of 88 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma; or Advanced Diploma; or Progression Diploma; or Access to HE Diploma of 60 credits)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

If you don’t have traditional qualifications or can’t meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Cyber Security Extended Degree BSc.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Official use and codes

Approved to run from 2016/17 Specification version 1 Specification status Validated
Original validation date 11 Jan 2017 Last validation date 18 Jan 2017  
Sources of funding HE FUNDING COUNCIL FOR ENGLAND
JACS codes I250 (Systems Auditing): 100%
Route code DIFOCS

Course Structure

Stage 1 Level 04 September start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
CC4002 Information Systems Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR TUE AM
          NORTH SPR+SUM WED PM
CS4001 Programming Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR TUE PM
          NORTH SPR+SUM WED AM
CT4005 Computer Hardware and Software Architectures Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR MON PM
          NORTH SPR+SUM THU PM
MA4001 Logic and Problem Solving Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR FRI AM

Stage 2 Level 05 September start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
CC5004 Security in Computing Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR TUE AM
CC5005 Computer Forensics Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR MON PM
CC5052 Risk, Crisis and Security Management Core 15 NORTH AUT THU PM
CS5001 Networks and Operating Systems Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR FRI AM
CS5052 Professional Issues, Ethics and Computer Law Core 15 NORTH SPR THU PM

Stage 3 Level 06 September start Offered

Code Module title Info Type Credits Location Period Day Time
CC6003 Digital Crime Investigation Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR MON AM
CC6004 Network and Cloud Security Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR WED AM
CC6051 Ethical Hacking Core 15 NORTH SPR THU AM
FC6P01 Project Core 30 NORTH AUT+SPR WED AM
          NORTH AUT WED AM
          NORTH SPR WED AM
FC6W51 Work Related Learning II Core 15 NORTH SPR WED PM
          NORTH AUT WED PM