module specification

BM7009 - Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Disease (2017/18)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2017/18
Module title Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Disease
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School School of Human Sciences
Total study hours 200
 
70 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
130 hours Guided independent study
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Practical Examination 20%   Assess GIS Practical
Coursework 30%   In-class Test Abstract writing
Coursework 50%   Report writing
Running in 2017/18 No instances running in the year

Module summary

This module focuses on the occurrence of emerging infectious diseases, their origins, evolution and epidemiological features that facilitates their adaptation to, and transmission within, human populations. A range of microbial pathogens will be reviewed and emphasis will be placed on their impact on public health and strategies for disease control. GIS will be covered as an example of an epidemiological tool.

Module aims

To examine the occurrence of emerging infectious diseases, their origins, evolution and epidemiological features that facilitates their adaptation to, and transmission within, human populations. A range of pathogens will be reviewed including, new pathogens such as rhinovirus C and the SARS coronavirus, exotic viruses such as Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever viruses, pandemic viruses such as HIV and influenza A and re-emerging pathogens such as Yellow Fever Virus and West Nile Fever Virus. Emphasis will be placed on their impact on public health and strategies for disease control. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of recent developments in infectious disease epidemiology and use their own judgement to critically reflect on the implications to public health. In conjunction with the above, the module will develop students' ability to appraise, research, critically evaluate, formulate and defend a 3,000 word report on a topical issue in this field.

Syllabus

Review the importance of epidemiological studies to our understanding of the nature of emerging infectious disease and in alerting and directing strategies for control.
Epidemiological methodologies including data collection /analysis, seroepidemiology, molecular epidemiology and surveillance will be considered as we examine the occurrence of specific diseases, their origins, evolution and features that facilitate adaptation to, and transmission within, human populations. (Emphasis will be placed on man’s activity and intrusion into sylvatic environments).
The application of Geographical Information Systems (computer-based systems for storing, manipulating and displaying mapped information and data) as an epidemiological tool will be illustrated by analysing data derived from the UK FMDV outbreak and will include practical sessions.
Pathogenic mechanisms, advances in diagnostic techniques, treatment and control will be considered along with the impact of such diseases on global public health.

Specific examples will include;
(i)    The haemorrhagic fever viruses
(ii)   Pandemic viruses such as HIV and Influenza A
(iii)  Malaria, parasite epidemiology, vector control
(iv)  Bovine Spongiform Encephalitis/New Variant CJD
(v)   The SARS coronavirus
(vi)  Respiratory viruses and the common cold

Learning and teaching

Students' receive 44 hours of instruction time which includes lectures, 2 assessed tests, a 4 hour practical session, researching exercises and interactive discussion sessions, a quiz and presentation session. Including the report researching and preparation time it will give approximately 200 hours student learning time in total.
Students' knowledge and understanding of epidemiology and emerging infectious disease will be developed through a programme of lectures and supporting exercises, together with the guided use of student centred learning resources. Lectures will be used to provide a conceptual framework. Student centred assignments; including the execution of a substantial written assignment will enable students to reinforce and expand their knowledge and develop subject skills and competence.
Personal development will be encouraged by tailoring the lectures and unassessed material to students’ backgrounds and aspirations after taking information during the first teaching session.
On completion of this module students’ provide an evaluation of how the module enabled them to develop skills such as information technology, organisational skills, team building, communication time management, and working under pressure.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student should be able to:
1.  Discuss, report, present and defend the importance of epidemiological studies to our understanding of the nature of infectious disease and in alerting and directing disease control activities.
2. Demonstrate a deep understanding of methodologies used in epidemiological investigations including that of GIS.
3. Recognise and relate the aetiology, pathogenesis and epidemiological features of particular emerging infectious diseases.
4. Understand and discuss some of the principles of disease control strategies.
5. Provide a critical and balanced review on a research topic.

Assessment strategy

The module will be summatively assessed by the completion of a 500 word assessment of the practical session (20%) by a 250 word abstract writing in-class test on a selected epidemiological topic (30%) and by a report writing exercise on a defined epidemiological topic (60%).

To pass the module students must achieve a minimum aggregate mark of 50%

Component   Learning outcomes
Pratical assessment 1,2,3
In class test 1, 2
Report writing   1,2,3,4

                      

Bibliography

Review papers:
DongJ et al (2008). Emerging pathogens: Challenges and successes of molecular diagnostics. Journal of Molecular Diagnostics 10:185-197.
Pekosz A, Glass G, E,. (2008) Emerging Viral Diseases. Md Med 9 (1) 11:13-16. Review
Snowden F, M. (2008). Emerging and reemerging diseases:a historical perspective. Immunol. Rev 225:9-26.
Morgan D et al (2009). Assessing the risk from emerging infections. Epidemiol Infect 137:1521-1530
Girard MP et al (2010) The 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus pandemic: A review. Vaccine 28:4895-4902
Miller E et al (2010). Incidence of 2009 pandemic infl uenza A H1N1 infection in
England: a cross-sectional serological study. The Lancet 375:1100-1108

Indicative texts:
Gordis L., (2008). Epidemiology, (paperback edition). Elsevier Saunders.