module specification

CT6051 - Traffic Engineering (2017/18)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2017/18
Module title Traffic Engineering
Module level Honours (06)
Credit rating for module 15
School School of Computing and Digital Media
Total study hours 150
 
45 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
105 hours Guided independent study
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Coursework 50%   Laboratory Report (2000 words)
Unseen Examination 50%   3-Hours Unseen Examination
Running in 2017/18
Period Campus Day Time Module Leader
Autumn semester North Tuesday Afternoon

Module summary

This module deals with the concept of Traffic Engineering which is a method of optimizing the performance and thus Quality of Service of a telecommunications network by dynamically analyzing, predicting and regulating the behaviour of data transmitted over that network. The fundamentals of traffic theory, performance evaluation and modelling are dealt with and the students will acquire the necessary tools for quantitative performance analysis of telecommunication networks and systems, and perform grade of service calculations. This method and its techniques may be applied to any network including PSTN, LANs, WANs, mobile, proprietary business as well as the Internet.

Module aims

1- To introduce to the students to the concept of Quality of Service (QoS) in Telecommunications and how the level of QoS differs between applications and services;
2- To introduce important traffic handling, provisioning and configuration mechanisms used to provide QoS;
3-To provide the fundamental principles of traffic engineering related to telecommunications and switching networks.
4-To present the management of traffic through telecommunications networks;
5-To provide the knowledge necessary to evaluate telecommunications network traffic solutions;
6-To provide an understanding of network design associated with traffic engineering;
7- To apply the concept of Traffic Engineering to optimize the performance and thus Quality of Service of a telecommunications network by dynamically analyzing, predicting and regulating the behaviour of data transmitted over that network.
 

Syllabus

Introduction to Traffic Engineering.
Telecommunication Applications and Bandwidth Requirements.
Quality of Service Fundamentals and Mechanisms.
Queue Analysis, Queue Management Algorithms, Feedback and Resource Reservation.
Characterisation of Telephone Traffic: Calling Rate, Holding Time, Traffic Volume, Traffic Intensity.
Grade of Service, Traffic Offered, Carried and Lost.
Traffic Model Selection Criteria.
Traffic theories: Binomial, Poisson, Erlang B, Engset, Erlang C.
Efficiency of Large Groups.
Degradation of Grade of Service with Overload.
Traffic Carried by the nth Trunk in a Group.
Applying Traffic Analysis to e.g. VoIP Networks.
 

Learning and teaching

The theoretical components of this module are delivered through a series of lectures supported by problem classes, tutorials, directed independent learning, and e-learning/blended learning. The assignments will require both group and individual work. It will involve application of knowledge of probability, stochastic processes, traffic theory and statistics to analyse and evaluate modern and evolving telecommunications networks. The assignments will be assessed by a written report.

Learning outcomes

At the end of this module students will be able to:
LO1.  Understand and appreciate the concept of QoS in telecommunication networks and how this differs between applications and services.
LO2.  Perform queuing analysis and determine the QoS of specific networks and services.
LO3.  Be able to evaluate based on network and service, and suggest important traffic handling, provisioning and configuration mechanisms in order to provide QoS and to determine the required level of resource reservation.
LO4.  Have an understanding of traffic theory and several statistical traffic models.
LO5.  Describe and discuss the validity of different performance modelling/assessment techniques;
LO6.  Apply traffic analysis to engineer robust and efficient telecommunications and switching networks and to design appropriate tools for analysing and simulating traffic performance;;
LO7.  Apply the concept of Traffic Engineering to optimize the performance and thus Quality of Service of a telecommunications network by dynamically analyzing, predicting and regulating the behaviour of data transmitted over that network.
 

Assessment strategy

Problem sheets (formative): learning is promoted through formative assessment based on problem sheets related to the lecture material. [LO 1-4]. Coursework (formative and summative): students will be presented with real-world scenario case-study assignment problems. They will be challenged with current research problems relevant to developments of new telecommunications technologies that are designed to meet QoS requirements of various services. Students will be encouraged to work in small groups and propose ways to tackle the problem and present their solution. Feedback on the submitted coursework report will be provided promptly. [LO 1-5]. Closed-book end of unit examination (summative): a 3-hour unseen examination paper is the major summative assessment instrument. [LO 1-4]. The module will be passed on the aggregate coursework and exam marks which is equal to or greater than 40%.

Bibliography

1. D. Gross, (2009),“Fundamentals of Queueing Theory”, ISBN 9780470547830
2. J.G. Proakis, (2008), "Digital Communications", McGraw-Hill, ISBN 9780072957167
3. S. Gravano, (2001), "Introduction to Error Control Codes", Oxford University Press, ISBN 0198562314
4. J. E. Flood, "Telecommunications, Switching, Traffic and Networks", Prentice Hall, ISBN0130333093
5. D. Bear, "Principles of Telecommunications Traffic Engineering'', Peter Peregrinus.
6. Bellamy, (2000), “Digital Telephony”, Wiley-Interscience, ISBN 047134571
7. Ash, G.R. (2006),”Traffic Engineering and QoS Optimization of Integrated Voice & Data Networks”, Morgan Kaufmann, ISBN 0123706254.
8. Farrel, A. (2008), “Network Quality of Service: Know It All, Morgan Kaufmann”, ISBN 0123745977.
9. Ganz, A., Ganz, Z. and Wongthavarawat, K. (2003), “Multimedia Wireless Networks: Technologies, Standards, and QoS”, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0130460990.
10. Olifer, N and Olifer V. (2006), “Computer Networks: Principles, Technologies and Protocols for Network Design”, Wiley, ISBN 0470869828.
11. Marchese, M. (2007), “QoS Over Heterogeneous Networks”, WileyBlackwell, ISBN 047001752X.