module specification

ED7143 - Facilitating Student Learning (2017/18)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2017/18
Module title Facilitating Student Learning
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School School of Social Professions
Total study hours 200
 
160 hours Guided independent study
40 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Coursework 100% 50 Portfolio
Running in 2017/18
Period Campus Day Time Module Leader
Year North To be arranged -

Module summary

The FSL module is the first, core, module of the HEA-Fellowship accredited PGCert LTHE programme.  FSL lays the foundation for this professional work-based learning programme.  Here, much of the raw material is derived from participants’ own current Learning & Teaching (L&T) Practice in HE.

The module is supported by a specific programme of workshops, through systematic investigation of practice through the critical reflective practitioner model.  This model facilitates effective initial professional development and for future CPD purposes to enable L&T practitioners to continually enhance students’ learning through their developing L&T practice.

The peer review and observations of L&T practice are an integral element in this process.

Participants are required to demonstrate the integration of critical reflection with analysis of L&T experience and underpin this all with the theoretical concepts, models and research from the current literature on learning and teaching in Higher Education and the role of HE today.

As these are all important elements in the professional development of teachers in HE, the assessment for the module brings together all elements into a developmental whole.

The FSL module thus aims to enable new and experienced staff with responsibilities for student learning and achievement to develop their professional competence in the delivery of teaching and/or the facilitation of student learning in higher education in a critically reflective and scholarly manner, armed with an understanding of how students may learn best, aimed at enhancing the student learning experience. 

This critical, systematic investigation of participants’ own professional practice is undertaken through exploration from the ‘micro’ to the ‘macro’-level and back again (i.e. from participants’ own L&T practice / experience / ideas, through to the context of your own subject/professional area, set within this University’s context – all set within the wider UK HE policy context, and back again to the individual), particularly through using critical reflection before, in and on action (Schon, 1987).

Module aims

FSL aims to enable new and experienced staff with responsibilities for student learning and achievement to develop their professional competence in the delivery of teaching and/or to facilitate enhanced student learning in higher education – doing so in a critically reflective and scholarly manner, armed with a theoretical and practical understanding of how students may learn best, seeking to enhance the student learning experience. 

This critical, systematic investigation of participants’ own professional practice is undertaken through exploration from the ‘micro’ to the ‘macro’-level and back again (i.e. from their own L&T practice / experience / ideas, through to the context of your own subject/professional area, set within this University’s context – all set within the wider UK HE policy context, and back again to the individual), particularly through using critical reflection before, in and on action.

The focus of DTFL is on the developing the role of the practitioner in enhancing, managing and supporting learning in higher education (HE) – in the context of LondonMet’s diverse student body in particular.

Central to this process is the development of the core knowledge, areas of practice and professional values articulated in the UK’s Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) .

The module actively explores the benefits and challenges of working with a diverse student body, and the range of skills and knowledge needed to support all of our students’ needs and the most effective approaches.  In so doing, it actively focuses on learner needs and attributes, and the skills of delivery and facilitation that enhance collaborative learning, critical reflection and self-directed study – which need to be underpinned by sound educational values and principles. 

FSL helps to set the context and provide the initial professional development of participant’s Learning & Teaching in HE – both for new and experienced staff - actively encouraging participants to examine and put this into practice within the context of the diverse role of being an educator within this University.  This will be the basis for development in further PGCert modules.

The intention of  FSL is to enable participants to learn effectively through critical and scholarly reflection on their experience, and the philosophy of action learning informed by professional critical reflection (Schon, 1983,1987), informed by action learning (Kolb, 1984) is particularly appropriate as the learning model for this module. 

The intention is to produce a change in participants’ L&T practice in HE, however small, which will form the basis for further critical and structured reflection in and on their own practice (IPD) and future development (CPD).  Such change will be informed by critical self-reflection /evaluation on participants’ developing practice (Schon, 1983), underpinned by scholarship and collegial discussion and feedback.

FSL does this by actively considering the benefits and challenges of working with a diverse student body and the range of skills and knowledge needed to support all of our students’ needs and the most effective approaches.  In so doing, we actively focus on learner needs and attributes, and the skills of delivery and facilitation that enhance collaborative learning, critical reflection and self-directed study – which need to be underpinned by sound educational values and principles.

Syllabus

The module addresses the following areas and issues:

  • Theories of student learning and approaches to study
  • The current context of Higher Education
  • The complexity of the learning and teaching process
  • A critical examination of various learning & teaching formats and activities
  • Creating a meaningful learning & teaching environment
  • Inclusive Learning & Teaching for Diversity
  • Learning in large and small groups
  • Peer review and observation of learning & teaching practice
  • Planning for Learning
  • Planning a module/course
  • Working with individuals / 1 to 1 teaching
  • Feedback and formative assessment
  • Critically reflective practice as a model of initial and continuing professional development

Learning and teaching

The module is delivered through:

· A workshop programme, which uses a variety of structures and processes to introduce the main concepts, theories, models and approaches specified in the syllabus and ensures that participants are familiar with the new subject matter, the professional context (HEA, UKPSF) in which they are developing their learning and teaching practice and the professional requirements and standards which inform good and noteworthy practice
-this supports the programme of independent study for the module and the module assessment, itself supported by the use of Weblearn.

· This is supplemented by integrated online synchronous workshops where real-life issues of learning and teaching are introduced, the medium of online learning is modelled and the opportunity exists to discuss own practice (in confidence) and assessment preparation.

· During the module, the participant will actively engage in peer, tutor and mentor observations of L&T practice and peer review; additionally a peer will reciprocally observe the participant . Feedback and discussion feed into the workshop programme, assessments and most importantly into the further enhancement of student learning through the development of L&T practice.
-the processes are modelled in the workshops, peer-support and peer learning is integrated into formative assessments and classroom activities
-participants are supported in understanding how to systematically investigate their own L&T practice and relate their teaching to the theories and research on student learning, developing inclusive L&T for diversity of learners and coherently relate all to their current and future developments and planned developments to professional practice, through the critically reflective practitioner model.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module, participants should be able to:

  1. Relate their work to the goals and purposes of Higher Education and current developments in Learning and Teaching practice.
  2. Identify the factors which can influence student learning, understand the impact of individual and social differences on the learning process.
  3. Design, develop and deliver effective learning, including the facilitation of effective group work and managing teaching in a large group setting.
  4. Critically reflect upon and improve their own teaching and facilitation techniques.

Additionally, DTFL meets the specified requirements of the UK Professional Standards Framework

Completion of this module can facilitate participants’ applications for Associate Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy (AFHEA).

Assessment strategy

The module is assessed by a  Learning and Teaching Portfolio containing:

1) (a) A review of a book chapter or article about Learning & Teaching in the participant’s own subject, including implications for own practice on the impact of the HE context and / or of the institutional policy on the teaching of your subject, written for your subject colleagues [LO1&4]

1) (b) One or more reflective logs on a session taught by the participant[LO1,2 &4]

2) Analysis of L&T practice including:

a) The analysis of the delivery of teaching and the facilitation of student learning

  1. analysis of the student group [LO2]
  2. objectives [LO1]
  3. Plan and structure [LO3]
  4. Implementation [LO3]
  5. Evaluation [LO4]

b) Evidence of peer, mentor and tutor review of L&T practice: being observed (by tutor, mentor and peer) and observation and review of a peer,  using self-evaluation and feedback discussions to enhance participant’s own practice [LO2,3&4]

3) Overall discursive and analytical scholarly meta-reflection,  informed by all elements, including  items 1&2, to demonstrate  insights gained about teaching and learning, changes in one’s L&T practice and the informed rationale for such changes.  Evidence to demonstrate these ‘lessons learned’ to form the Evidential element of the portfolio.[LO4]

Additionally, participants must demonstrate / map in the final portfolio where they have met the relevant UKPSF standards, and integrated them into their practice.

Bibliography

Core Text: Fry H, Ketteridge S, & Marshall S, eds  (2008) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 3rd ed. London:  Kogan Page (NB: this is available as an e-book via Londonmet Library)
Archer L, Hutchings M, Leathwood, C. & Ross. A. (2003) ‘Widening Participation in Higher Education: Implications for policy and practice’ in L. Archer et al., Higher Education and Social Class. Issues of exclusion and inclusion London: Routledge Farmer
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Biggs J.B  & Tang, C. (2007) Teaching for Quality Learning at University 3rd Ed. Berkshire: Open University Press/McGraw-Hill
Boud D & Walker D (1998) ‘Promoting reflection in professional courses; the challenge of context’ in Studies in Higher Education Vol 23 No 2
Dearing Report (1997) Higher Education in the Learning Society: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/ncihe/
Freire P (1985) The Politics of Education London: Macmillan
Jacques D & Salmon G (2008) Learning in Groups (3rd  Edition) London: Kogan Page
Jary D. (ed.) (2003) Benchmarking and Quality Management: The debate in UK Higher Education Higher Education Academy Subject Network: C-SAP monograph
Knapper CK & Cropley A (2000) Lifelong learning in higher education London : Kogan Page
Knight PT & Yorke M (2003) Assessment, learning and employability Maidenhead : Society for Research into Higher Education & Open University Press
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Kolb DA (1984) Experiential Learning Prentice-Hall New Jersey USA : Englewood Cliffs
Laurillard D (2007) Rethinking University Teaching 3rd ed London: Routledge
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McGill I & Beaty L (2001) Action Learning: A guide for professional, management and educational development 2nd ed London: Kogan Page
Mortimore T (2008) Dyslexia and Learning Styles: A Practitioner’s Handbook  2nd ed London: Whurr
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