module specification

GI7040 - Citizenship and Social Justice (2018/19)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2018/19
Module title Citizenship and Social Justice
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School School of Social Sciences
Total study hours 200
 
42 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
86 hours Assessment Preparation / Delivery
72 hours Guided independent study
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Seminar 20%   Seminar presentation chosen from a list of questions, each of which has a designated week.
Unseen Examination 80%   Essay answering one of the set questions, which may, but need not, be that chosen for seminar presentation.
Running in 2018/19
Period Campus Day Time Module Leader
Spring semester North Thursday Evening

Module summary

 According to republican ideals, citizenship originally denoted being an active part of a city and its civil society, of a polis and its political community, not simply the possessor of a passport. This module explores the changing meaning and continuing potential of citizenship, including the modern separation of the politics of the sovereign, bureaucratic state from the market society of its economically active subjects, and the failure of twentieth-century attempts to use states’ representative democracy to democratize society and justify corporate and institutionalized power in terms of citizens’ participation. This failure has much to do with the massive scale of modern political and economic organization, and the module will explore recent arguments about both the politics of locality and community and the relation of citizenship and rights to duties, virtues, and justice.

Module aims

• To provide a historical and critical introduction to ideas, theories and arguments about
             citizenship and social justice.
• To explore ethical ideas and to articulate such ideas in the construction of a logical  argument.
• To relate philosophical propositions to political, social and economic issues and to  institutional, legal and policy prescriptions.
Module learning outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
• understand the sources and development of contemporary ideas and practices of
citizenship;
• analyze, articulate, criticize and defend ethical ideas, and apply such ideas in the
evaluation of political ideologies and institutions and of social and economic policies;
• present and defend a logical argument supported by relevant evidence.

Module aims

 
 

Syllabus

 
Universality, Nationality, and Locality LO1, LO3
Ethics and Politics of Common Goods LO2, LO3
Citizenship: From Participation to Passivity? LO1, LO3
Ethics and Politics of Rights LO2, LO3

Balance of independent study and scheduled teaching activity

Scheduled lectures and seminars are supported by Weblearn and students’ independent reading of recommended reading and research. Students are required to make a seminar presentation and to participate in critical discussion of lectures and presentations.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this module students will be able to:
• understand the sources and development of contemporary ideas and practices of
citizenship;
• analyze, articulate, criticize and defend ethical ideas, and apply such ideas in the
evaluation of political ideologies and institutions and of social and economic policies;
• present and defend a logical argument supported by relevant evidence.

Bibliography

 
Core Text

Fives, Allyn  Political and Philosophical Debates in Welfare, Palgrave Macmillan,
   2008.

Other Texts

Beadle, Ron, & Learning from MacIntyre, Cambridge University Press, 2019.
Geoff Moore edd.

Bielskis, Andrius,  Virtue and Economy: Essays on Morality and Markets,
& Kelvin Knight edd.  Ashgate, 2015.

Brooks, Thom, ed. Ethical Citizenship: British Idealism and the Politics of Recognition,
   Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

Edmundson,  John Rawls: Reticent Socialist, Cambridge University Press, 2017.
William A.   

Hodgson,  From Pleasure Machines to Moral Communities: An Evolutionary
Geoffrey M.   Economics without Homo economicus, University of Chicago Press,
   2013.

Hodgson,  Wrong Turnings: How the Left Got Lost, University of Chicago Press,
Geoffrey M.  2018.

Irwin, Terence              The Development of Ethics, vol. 3: From Kant to Rawls, Oxford
   University Press, 2009.

Kellow, Geoffrey, & On Civic Republicanism: Ancient Lessons for Global Politics,
  Neven Leddy edd. University of Toronto Press, 2016.

Knight, Kelvin  Aristotelian Philosophy: Ethics and Politics from Aristotle to MacIntyre,
   Polity Press, 2007.

Longo, Matthew The Politics of Borders: Sovereignty, Security, and the Citizen after
   9/11, Cambridge University Press, 2017.

MacIntyre,  Ethics in the Conflicts of Modernity: An Essay on Desire, Practical
Alasdair  Reasoning, and Narrative, Cambridge University Press, 2016.

Moore, Geoff   Virtue at Work: Ethics for Individuals, Managers, and Organizations,
   Oxford University Press, 2017.

Moyn, Samuel  Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World, Harvard University
   Press, 2018.

Rawls, John  A Theory of Justice, Oxford University Press, 1999 (2nd edn.).

Rawls, John  Lectures on the History of Moral Philosophy, ed. Barbara Herman,
   Harvard University Press, 2000.

Skinner, Quentin Liberty before Liberalism, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Journals

Ethics: An International Journal of Social, Political and Legal Philosophy

Res Publica: A Journal of Legal and Social Philosophy

Review of Politics