module specification

GI7040 - Citizenship and Social Justice (2017/18)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2017/18, but may be subject to modification
Module title Citizenship and Social Justice
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School School of Social Sciences
Total study hours 200
 
167 hours Guided independent study
33 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Seminar 20%   Seminar presentation
Unseen Examination 80%   Unseen exam *FC*
Running in 2017/18
Period Campus Day Time Module Leader
Spring semester North Wednesday Evening

Module summary

Provides a historical and critical overview of ideas and arguments about citizenship and social justice.

Module aims

To provide a historical and critical introduction to ideas and arguments about citizenship  and social justice.
• To explore ethical ideas and to articulate such ideas in the construction of a logical  argument.
• To relate philosophical propositions to political, social and economic issues and to  institutional, legal and policy prescriptions.
 

Syllabus

Politics and Ethics
Citizenship in Western History
Civil Society's Emergence from History
Ethics as Universality
Capitalism and Socialism
Idealism, Utilitarianism, Welfare
Social Democracy and Social Citizenship
Neo-Liberalism, Political Liberalism, and Social Justice
A Big Society?
Citizenship Globalized
 

Learning and teaching

Lectures and seminars. Seminars are organised around individual student presentations. These presentations address questions concerning issues contextualised for other students by a lecture which precedes the seminar.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Understand the sources and development of contemporary ideas and practices of citizenship.
  • Analyze, articulate, criticize and defend ethical ideas, and apply such ideas in the evaluation of political ideologies and institutions and of social and economic policies.
  • Present and defend a logical argument supported by relevant evidence.
     

Assessment strategy

Seminars are organised around individual student presentations. These presentations address questions concerning issues contextualised for other students by a lecture which precedes the seminar. Students give a verbal and written presentation, the latter copied for all members of the class to facilitate engagement with the argument. The exam is designed to demonstrate students’ level and range of knowledge and understanding of the topic.

Bibliography

Fives, Allyn   Political and Philosophical Debates in Welfare, Palgrave Macmillan,   2008
Hayek, F. A.  The Constitution of Liberty, Routledge, 1960.
MacIntyre, Alasdair A Short History of Ethics: A History of Moral Philosophy from the  Homeric Age to the Twentieth Century, Routledge, 1999 (2nd ed.).
Marshall, T. H., & Citizenship and Social Class, Pluto, 1992.
Tom Bottomore
Miller, David  Principles of Social Justice, Harvard University Press, 1999.
Rawls, John  Justice as Fairness: A Restatement, ed. Erin Kelly, Harvard University   Press, 2001.
Sen, Amartya  The Idea of Justice, Allen Lane, 2009.