module specification

SE7002 - Equality and Inclusion in Early Childhood (2018/19)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2018/19
Module title Equality and Inclusion in Early Childhood
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 30
School School of Social Professions
Total study hours 300
 
225 hours Guided independent study
75 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Coursework 100%   Essay
Running in 2018/19
Period Campus Day Time Module Leader
Autumn semester LMET Distance Learning Not applicable -

Module summary

This module explores the principles behind and perceptions of issues of equality and inclusion in early childhood. Political, historical, legislative, UK and international contexts are explored to encourage students to question and consider models of effective inclusive practice and the importance of challenging inequalities.

Module aims

This module aims to enable students to:

  • Critically examine the political, historical and legislative context of issues of equality and inclusion
  • Develop an in-depth knowledge of a range of issues of equality and inclusion in early childhood
  • Consider how they promote effective inclusive practice in their work
  • Consider their role in promoting social justice and advocacy within early childhood

Syllabus

This module explores the principles behind and perceptions of issues of equality and inclusion in early childhood. Political, historical, legislative, UK and international contexts are explored to encourage students to question and consider models of effective inclusive practice and the importance of challenging inequalities.

The module also presents an in depth focus on particular issues of inclusion, for example:
- SEN and disability
- Families
- Sexuality
- Race and culture
- Poverty
- Gender
- Social class
- Social exclusion
- Leadership for inclusion

Learning and teaching

Students will receive theoretical input through bespoke on-line module materials with access to an allocated tutor who is available to support them either face-to-face, by e-mail or by telephone. All students will benefit from a blended learning approach through the use of WebLearn for supplementary materials, links to E-books, on-line discussions and self-assessment exercises such as reflective tasks.

Reflection and discussion are key to teaching – reflection will be promoted by the discussion-board exercises incorporated into the web-based materials. 

Teaching and learning strategies and methods will link module content to workplace skills and professionalism in the early years.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

1. outline and discuss the political, historical and legislative context of issues of equality and inclusion
2. critically analyse the impact of inequalities and marginalisation on children and their families
3. reflectively and critically examine their role in implementing effective inclusive practice, including consideration of their role as an advocate for social justice

Assessment strategy

Students will demonstrate that they have met the learning outcomes through the submission of an essay (6000 – 7000 words) which explores a question relating to the relationship between early years’ service and issues of inequality and inclusion.

Bibliography

Alderson P. (2nd Ed) (2008) Young Children's Rights: Exploring Beliefs, Principles and Practice, London: Jessica Kingsley

Browne, J. (2012) The Impact of Austerity Measures on Households with Children. London: Family and Parenting Institute

Connolly, P. (2004) Boys and Schooling in the Early Years. London: RoutledgeFalmer

Dorling, D. (2010) Injustice – Why Social Inequality Persists. Bristol: The Policy Press

Field, F. (2010) The Foundation Years: preventing poor children becoming poor adults. London: HM Government

Johnson, P. and Kossykh, Y, (2008) Early Years, Life Chances and Equality: a literature review. Manchester: Equality and Human Rights Commission

Lane, J. (2008) Young Children and Racial Justice. London: National Children’s Bureau

MacNaughton, G. (2000) Rethinking Gender in the Early Childhood Education. London: Allyn Unwin

Manning-Morton, J. (2014) (Ed) Exploring Well-being in the Early Years. Maidenhead: OUP McGraw-Hill Education

Marmot, M et al, (2011) Fair Society, Healthy Lives. London: Marmot Review

Melhuish, E., Sylva, C., Sammons, P., Siraj-Blatchford, I. & Taggart, B. (2001). Social,
Behavioural and Cognitive development at 3-4 years in relation to family background.
The effective provision of pre-school education, EPPE project. London: DfEE / The
Institute of Education

Muncie, J. (et al) (1997) Understanding the Family; Sage: London

Robinson, K. (2005) “Doing Anti-homophobia and Anti-heterosexism in Early Childhood Education: moving beyond the immobilising impacts of ‘risks’, ‘fears’ and ‘silences’. Can We Afford Not To?” Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, Vol. 6, No. 2, 175-188.

Robinson, K. and Diaz,C. (2006) Diversity and Difference in Early Childhood Education: Issues for Theory and Practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press

Runswick-Cole, K., (2011) Time to end the bias towards inclusive education?; British Journal of Special Education; Volume 38, Number 3 pp112-119; Blackwell Publishing: Oxford

Thomas, G. and Vaughan, M. (2004), Inclusive Education: readings and reflections. Miadenhead: Open University Press

Underdown, A. (2007) Young Children’s health and well-being; Open University Press: Maidenhead

Vincent, C. Braun, A. and Ball, S.J. (2007) Childcare, Choice and Social Class: caring for young children in the UK. London: Institute of Education

Wilkinson, R. and Pickett, K. (2010) The Spirit Level - Why Equality is Better for Everyone. London: Penguin

Wilson, R (1998) Special Educational needs in the Early Years; Routledge: London