module specification

SM7089 - Globalisation (2016/17)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2016/17
Module title Globalisation
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School School of Social Sciences
Total study hours 300
 
270 hours Guided independent study
30 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Coursework 50%   Country Profile
Coursework 50%   Essay (2000 words)
Running in 2016/17 No instances running in the year

Module summary

This module introduces debates around global communications and the critical role played by international policy and regulatory organisations, for example the World Trade Organisation, International Telecommunications Union, and UNESCO. A critical analysis of theoretical debates around globalisation, cultural imperialism and development as well as the economic and political factors, which underlie the communications structure of specific countries, is also covered.

Prior learning requirements

None

Module aims

The module aims are:

To introduce students to debates around global communications and the critical role played by international policy and regulatory organisations;

To engage in a critical analysis of theoretical debates around globalisation, cultural imperialism and development;

To consider the economic and political factors which underlie the communications structure of specific countries

Syllabus

The module will cover theories in economics and characteristics of the information and cultural product; internationalization of production and globalization of markets; corporate strategies.
growth of the advertising and media industries; commodification of services and globalization; relative price effect and value added.
It will also cver international flow of communications; trade in information and cultural products;Communications and Development theories; theories of Mattelart, Schiller and Hamelink. Theories of cultural imperialism. The ITU and spectrum allocation; industrialised countries versus LICs and NICs; the role of the US;
The World Trade Organisation and the debate around liberalisation of trade in services and telecoms; Case studies of communications in Lics and Nics e.g. India, Brazil, Ireland, Jamaica.

Learning and teaching

Teaching methods include formal lectures, tutorials, seminar discussions and screenings. Students will be expected to attend formal lectures and take notes; read from primary sources as well as secondary sources and comment upon their reading. Students will be expected to co-operate during group work, conduct independent research and participate in small group and large group discussions with fellow students. Seminars will frequently involve presentations and student-led activities.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
1. Describe historical, economic and political factors which shape international flows of information
and culture;

2.Critically evaluate theories of globalisation, cultural imperialism and development in relation to
international communications organisations;

3. Profile and critically discuss the communications structure and policies of one country.

Assessment strategy

1. . A 2000 word profile of the communications structure of a chosen country (weighting 50%): this cannot be UK, US or your own country. This part of the assessment is designed to encourage students to apply the theories and concepts that are covered in a course to the study of a specific country and to develop the research skills.This assessment will test learning outcomes 1 and 3.

2. A 2000 word essay on one aspect of globalization and international communications (weighting 50%). This is a more substantial theoretical and analytical piece of work, where students are required to use the frameworks developed from the module.This assessment will test learning outcomes 1 and 2.

Students may pass on aggregate.

Bibliography

R.V. Bettig (1996)Copyrighting Culture, Westview Press.
F. Corcoran et al.(1995) Democracy and Communication in the New Europe, Hampton Press.
G. Gerbner et al (1996) Invisible Crisis, Westview.
P. Golding and P. Harris (eds.) (1996) Beyond Cultural Imperialism, Sage.
C. Hamelink (1994) The Politics of World Communication, Sage.
E. Herman (1997) The Global Media, Cassell.
A. Mohammadi, (ed.) (1997)International Communication and Globalization, Sage.
V. Mosco (1995)The Political Economy of Communication, Sage.
Sreberny-Mohammadi, A.et al (eds.) (1997) Media in a Global Context-A Reader, Arnold.
Thussu, D. (ed.) (1998) Electronic Empires-Global Media and Local Resistance, Arnold.
Thussu, D. (2000) International Communication-continuity and change, Arnold.