module specification

SS7066 - Military and Security Responses to Terrorism (2017/18)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2017/18
Module title Military and Security Responses to Terrorism
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities
Total study hours 200
 
170 hours Guided independent study
30 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Coursework 50%   Essay
Coursework 50%   Essay
Running in 2017/18 No instances running in the year

Module summary

Military and Security responses to Counter-terrorism is aimed at identifying these specific and changing techniques and evaluating them in their operational and ethical contexts. 
 

Module aims

This module will examine and evaluate the recent military and intelligence led responses to counter-terrorism. It will outline and evaluate these tactics and techniques in relation to both their ethical justifications and their operational effectiveness. The module will review the wide variety of techniques deployed by the military and security services. The key areas covered will include-

  • Targeted killings
  • The deployment of Special Forces
  • The use of air strikes 
  • The use of unmanned aerial vehicles
  • Covert Human Intelligence techniques
  • Enhanced Interrogation techniques
  • SIGNIT
  • Counter-terrorism legislation

Syllabus

Following an introductory session the module will address the following topics

  • Targeted killings
  • The use of Unmanned aerial vehicles
  • Covert Human Intelligence Sources
  • Enhanced Interrogation techniques
  • SIGNIT
  • Counter-terrorism legislation

Learning and teaching

Teaching sessions consist of a series of lectures and seminar group sessions in which students are encouraged to explore the political, strategic and tactical complexities of terrorism and counter terrorism. Students draw upon case studies and examine actual operational scenarios. Module materials will be made available on Blackboard (Web-learn) and opportunities for personal development planning are provided in seminar contexts. Students are expected to undertake 10 hours of independent study per week.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Describe and analyse a variety of counter-terrorism strategies.
  • Produce a case study of specific counter-terrorism techniques used by the security services. intervention by the security services.
  • Produce a case study of specific counter-terrorism techniques used the military
  • Evaluate the legitimacy and effectiveness of these counter terrorism policies, strategies and operations

Assessment strategy

Students to write two essays of 2,500 words each. Essay 1 will focus on a comparison of military counter-terrorism technique and explore their operational effectiveness and their ethical/legal dimensions. Essay 2 will focus on a comparison of security service counter-terrorism techniques and explore their operational effectiveness and their ethical/legal  dimensions.

Bibliography

Aldrich, R. (2011) GCHQ; The Uncensored Story of Britain's Most Secret Spy Agency.
London: Harper Press.
Bamford, J. (2009) The Shadow Factory. London; Random House.
Corera, G. (2012) MI6 Life and death in the British Secret Service. London . Phoenix
Ganor, B. (2011) The Count-terrorism Puzzle. A guide for Decision Makers. London . Transaction Publishers.
English, R. (2009) Terrorism: How to Respond Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hewitt, S. (2007) The British War on Terror: Terrorism and Counter-terrorism on the Home Front Since 9/11. London. Continuum.
Lynch, A, McGarrity, N.,& Williams, G.  (eds) (2012) Counter-Terrorism and Beyond; The culture of law and Justice after 9/11 London . Routledge.
Macke, C. (2013) Counter-terrorism and the Detention of Suspected Terrorists: Preventive Detention and International Human Rights Law. London Routledge.
Urban M. (2011) Task Force Black: The explosive true story of the SAS and the secret war in Iraq.
Said, W.  (2010) The Terrorist Informant. Washington Law Review, Vol 85,No.4.
Salter, M. & Zureik. E  (eds) (2005) Global Surveillance and Policing; Border Security, Identity. Cullumpton; Willan.
Storm, M. (2014) Agent Storm. London; Penguin