module specification

SW5052 - Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work (2017/18)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2017/18
Module title Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work
Module level Intermediate (05)
Credit rating for module 15
School School of Social Professions
Total study hours 150
 
45 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
105 hours Guided independent study
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Coursework 100%   Essay based on a Case Study analysis
Running in 2017/18
Period Campus Day Time Module Leader
Spring semester North Tuesday Afternoon

Module summary

The module focuses on the need for students to analyse theoretical perspectives relevant to social work taking into account the practical and ethical impact these perspectives have upon different individuals, groups and communities. In addition they need to critically evaluate different theoretical perspectives and research-evidence with regard to relations of power and anti-oppressive practice relevant to social work in a manner that may be innovative, utilising knowledge from social work practice and theories relating to practice.

 

Module aims

• To enable students to understand and analyse the contested nature of social work explanations for the existence and circumstances of service users and the
intervention implied by these explanations.

• To identify and analyse theoretical perspectives relevant to social work taking into account the practical and ethical impact these perspectives have upon different
individuals, groups and communities.

• To critically evaluate different theoretical perspectives with regard to relations of power and anti-oppressive practice relevant to social work

Syllabus

- Social work theories, methods and applications to practice
- Psychodynamic and psychosocial approaches
- Cognitive-Behavioural Approaches
- Systems theory
- Humanism and Person-Centered work
- Radical, critical, and Postmodern approaches
- Task-Centred intervention
- Crisis intervention

Learning and teaching

Students’ learning will be developed through their engagement with a range of individual and group-based learning and teaching methods including small group learning, exploring case-study analysis, debates and interactive workshops, problem based learning, personal reflection and reflective writing, use of Weblearn, service user reflections, video materials and other online educational content. Students will be expected to access educational resources independently and also to work with peers outside of the formal teaching contact hours.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

1. Discuss relevant theoretical perspectives and how these contribute to the knowledge base of social work

2. Analyse social work theories, demonstrating critical awareness of their implications for service users, taking into account existing power dynamics and the practical and ethical impact on individuals, groups and communities

3. Apply appropriate theory to practice with diverse client groups and communities

4. Demonstrate a critical knowledge of social work theory, research and evidence, and evaluate how they inform interventions with service users including practice responses to the contexts of poverty and social exclusion

Assessment strategy

The assessment strategy consists of a series of formative exercises to help students to develop their ability to understand the theoretical basis for social work. This will deepen their understanding and application of theories to social work practice. Class based exercises are designed to develop critical abilities in relation ot theory through formative analysis of case studies undertaken regularly in small groups. With class debates also used to stimulate critical approaches to theories and allowing individual and general feedback to can be given immediately. They together with an individual essay plan will  support development of the required skills to complete the summative assessment which is a 2,500 words essay based on a case study analysis to assess all the learning outcomes.

Bibliography

Adams, R., Dominelli, L. & Payne, M (eds) (2009) Critical practice in social work (2nd ed.) Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Adams, R., Dominelli, L. & Payne, M (eds) (2009) Social work: themes, issues and Critical debates (3nd ed.)  Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Adams, R., Dominelli, L., Payne, M. (eds) & Campling, J. (consultant ed.) (2005) Social work futures : crossing boundaries, transforming practice (3nd ed.)  Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Lavalette, M. (2011) Radical Social Work Today , Bristol Policy Press
Garrett, P.M. (2013) Social Work Theory: Making Connections, Bristol: Policy Press
Gray, M. & Webb, S. (eds.),(2012) Social work: theories and methods (2nd ed.)  London: Sage
Horner, N. (2012) What is social work?: context and perspectives (4th ed.), Exeter: Learning Matters
Howe, D. (2011) Attachment across the life course : a brief introduction Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Parrish, M (2009) Social work perspectives on human behaviour Buckingham: Open University Press
Payne, M (2005) Modern social work theories (3rd ed.) Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan
Okitikpi, T (2011) Social Control and the Use of Power in Social Work with Children and Families Lyme Regis: Russell House
Stepney, P. & Ford, D. (eds.), Social work models, methods and theories: a framework For practice (2nd ed.), Lyme Regis: Russell House
Teater, B. & Baldwin, M. (2012) Social Work in the Community: Making a Difference Bristol Policy Press
Victor, G. (2012) Major thinkers in welfare: contemporary issues in historical perspective  Bristol: Policy Press