module specification

SW7002 - Critical Aspects of Human Growth and Development (2017/18)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2017/18, but may be subject to modification
Module title Critical Aspects of Human Growth and Development
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
Coursework 100%   Portfolio
Running in 2017/18 No instances running in the year

Module summary

This module aims to prepare students for effective social work through a
critical examination and reflection of theories of child development and evaluation of their
application through observational skills and research evidence. Additionally students will develop
knowledge and understanding in order to examine some of the specific difficulties and
disadvantages faced by adults who use social work services and assess the value to the
individual of differing types of support.

SEMESTER: Autumn
PREREQUISITE: None
ASSESSMENT: Portfolio of tasks
NOTES: None

Prior learning requirements

None

Module aims

This module aims to prepare students for effective social work through a critical examination and reflection of sociological and psychological theories of child development and evaluation of their application through observational skills and research evidence. Students will need to critically analyse and develop a comprehensive understanding of ‘normal’ child developmental milestones within the parameters of diverse cultures. In addition students will gain competence in explaining and analysing specific difficulties faced by people who need the help and support of social services because of ill-health or disability, whilst evaluating the value to the individual of differing types of support, and reflecting also on concepts of helplessness and control within the context of anti oppressive theory and practice.

Syllabus

·The relevant developmental milestones, and factors which promote sound physical, social, psychological, emotional and intellectual development in children.

·Study of relationships between children and their families in a range of social, family and community structures through observation and a consideration of their inner/external worlds.

·Developing observation and reflection skills, evaluating healthy development and need, reflecting on evidence, integrating theory and practice.

·Attachment, loss and change: the short and long term effects of trauma, ill-treatment, separation and substitution care.

·Adolescence

·Inequality and regulation : understand a range of explanations of the physical, intellectual, psychological, emotional, spiritual and social development of children, and of their behaviour, in the context of a multi-racial and diverse society - good enough parenting, legal intervention and care and control.

·Life events and transitions - a life course perspective; coping with adult health or emotional problems; helplessness and control.

·Adult mental ill-health: understanding key features associated with particular diagnoses (eg depression, schizophrenia); prevalence and distribution, treatments, support needs; effects on lifestyle and opportunity; service user perspectives.

·Learning disability: common types and causes; prevalence and distribution; effects on lifestyle and opportunity; service user perspectives.

·Long-term and terminal illness: issues for the individual and their families; coping with loss and bereavement.

·Physical impairment and disability: prevalence and range of associated difficulties; support needs; helpful aids and adaptations; effects on lifestyle and opportunity; service user perspectives.

·Myths and reality of normal aging; prevalence and types of ill-health associated with old age; caring roles and experiences.

Learning and teaching

Lectures, seminars, workshops involving service users or informal carers, and videos addressing the core capabilities for the module

This module will further develop students critical awareness of ‘typical’ development and the life course and some of the common problems of ill-health and disability with which so many people live. This will be developed through direct observation of typical or 'average' child behaviour and through the involvement in some of the sessions of people living with ill-health and, or disability. There will be a wide range of factual information about specific types of health problems, disabilities, and the implications of these for the individual and their family and friends.There is a strong theoretical base covering child development, and reflecting on issues of social support, environmental issues and sense of control in relation to coping with illness and disability.There is a strong focus on a service user perspective and students will be expected to draw on a range of sources including journals and websites to support their learning and comprehensive understanding of research findings and current issues.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this module students should be able to:

(LO1) Engage in a critical analysis of the relevant sociological and psychological theories which
attempt to explain the development of children, including those from different cultures and with
diverse needs.

(LO2) Critically evaluate the contested nature of developmental theories through direct
observation of a child

(LO3) Articulate and explain normal development in childhood and provide explanations of the
potential adverse effects on development of experiences such as change, loss, abuse and
disruption.

(LO4) Critically evaluate specific day to day difficulties of, and disadvantages faced by people
with a physical or a learning disability or long-term physical or mental ill-health.

(LO5) Evaluate and justify the types of support those living with ill-health or disability most value,
drawing on both a client perspective, and on knowledge of the specific features associated with
particular diagnoses.


This module is informed by the academic subject benchmarks for social work and will help you
begin to meet the following national occupational standards in practice:

Key Role 1: Prepare for, and work with individuals, families, carers, groups and communities to
assess their needs and circumstances

(Unit 2) Work with individuals, families, carers, groups and communities to help them make
informed decisions

(Unit 3) Assess needs and options to recommend a course of action

Key Role 2 : Plan, carry out, review and evaluate social work practice, with individuals, families,
carers, groups, communities and other professionals

(Unit 4.) Respond to crisis situations

(Unit 5) Interact with individuals, families, carers, groups and communities to achieve change and
development and to improve life opportunities.

Assessment strategy

The integration of theory and practice will be assessed through a portfolio of tasks which draw on the child observations, service user perspectives, research and theory to reflect on practical examples and case studies. Hence all five learning outcomes will be assessed through the portfolio.
(LO1, LO2, LO3, LO4, LO5)

Bibliography

Adams, R Dominelli, P and Payne, M (2002) Critical Practice in Social Work. Hampshire: Palgrave
Aldgate, J Jones, D Rose, W and Jeffery, C (eds) (2006) The Developing World of the Child. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers Limited
Beckett C (2002) Human Growth and Development. Sage Publications
Crawford, K and Walker, J (2003) Social Work and Human Development Exeter: Learning Matters
Daniel, B Wassell, S and Gilligan, R (1999) Child Development for Child Care and Protection Workers. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Davies, M (ed) (2004) The Blackwell Companion to Social Work 2nd Edition Blackwell
Fawcett, M (1996) Learning Through Child Observation. London: Jessica Kingsley Press
Fernando, S (2001) Mental Health, Race & Culture. (2nd edition.) Palgrave.
Fook, J and Gardner F (2007) Practicing Critical Reflection Berkshire Open University Press
Hockey, J and James, A (2002) Social Identities Across the Life Course. Palgrave.
Howe, D (1999) Attachment Theory, Child Maltreatment and Family Support: Macmillan
Oliver, M (1996) Understanding disability: from theory to practice. Macmillan: Basingstoke.
Phillison, C Bernard, M. Phillips, J. & Ogg, J. (2001) The family and community life of older people. London: Routledge
Pilgrim, D and Rogers, A (2002) Mental Health and Inequality. Palgrave

Websites
www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html - Disability research website
http://disabledinfo.com/web/ - help and information for disabled people
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/ - The site contains factsheets and booklets on mental illness, resource guides and directories and a mailing list "Choice Forum
http://mentalhelp.net/ - A comprehensive guide to mental health online
www.mind.org.uk/ - MIND is the National Association for Mental Health in England and Wales
www.learningdisabilities.org.uk- Website on learning disabilities/difficulties in the UK
www.shapingourlives.org.uk/links.htm - National Service Users Network