module specification

TR7052 - Public Service Interpreting (2018/19)

Module specification Module approved to run in 2018/19
Module title Public Service Interpreting
Module level Masters (07)
Credit rating for module 20
School Guildhall School of Business and Law
Total study hours 200
 
126 hours Guided independent study
74 hours Scheduled learning & teaching activities
Assessment components
Type Weighting Qualifying mark Description
In-Course Test 25%   Interpreting exam 1
Coursework 30%   2000 words essay (Weblearn Submission)
Unseen Examination 45% 50 Interpreting exam 2
Running in 2018/19 No instances running in the year

Module summary

This module introduces students to the context of Public Service Interpreting, mainly the English Law, i.e. working as an interpreter for Immigration Services, the Police, the Courts and Probation Services. Students will interpret using two modes of interpreting: consecutive interpreting and simultaneous interpreting. They will also practice sight translation. The module alternates generic sessions where the legal system is explained and language specific sessions where students can practice public service interpreting in the legal context.

Module aims

The module aims are:

1. To acquire a broad knowledge of Public Service Interpreting for the legal system (the courts, the police and the immigration services) and to gain an understanding of the interpreting process relevant in these areas;
2. To be aware of what is needed to interpret competently in the specific context of Public Service Interpreting;
3. To be able to identify the problems raised in the interpreting (transfer) process of this particular mode  and understand why they occur;
4. To develop knowledge of the interpreting strategies, procedures and techniques used to solve such problems and learn how to use them appropriately;
5. To acquire a critical awareness of the importance of context, register and the speaker's attitude in the interpreting process and the role they play in the decisions and choices made during the interpreting assignment;
6.  To be able to support effective communication throughout the interpreting act and to intervene as appropriate in a competent fashion when communication breaks down;
7. To develop an awareness of the sensitive nature of public service interpreting and the ability to deal with such situations in accordance with client etiquette and the interpreter's Code of Practice;
8.   To acquire a comprehensive knowledge of the legal aspect of Public Service Interpreting such as the Professional Code of Practice and client etiquette.

Syllabus

The module provides a general introduction to the context of legal Public Service in the legal field, the legal aspects of the profession, the code of practice and client etiquette. Students are familiarised with the techniques of consecutive and whispering interpreting, practice the techniques and learn to evaluate when to use them. In the remaining weeks of the module, students are taught the subject knowledge required for the legal option of Public Service Interpreting and are given the opportunity to acquire practical experience in Legal Service interpreting in practical language- specific sessions, where they simulate relevant interpreting situations. In the course of this practical component students learn to recognise transfer (interpreting) problems, pinpoint the reasons for their occurrence, find solutions and explain the strategies, procedures and techniques used to solve such problems.

Learning and teaching

The module is delivered in the form of generic seminars and language specific tutorials during which students are introduced to Public Service Interpreting skills in a legal context.

The module introduces students Immigration Services in the UK, the Police and the Courts in England and Wales. Students will build their glossaries in class, and during their independent studies. The use of Weblearn will enhance this task as students exchange and contribute to each other’s work in a reflective manner.

The module is very practical with the use of simulated role plays where students will interpret both in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting (Chuchotage). They will be asked to perform in various contexts, taking into account specific issues relating to Public Service Interpreting such as the use of register adapted to all situations, terminology issues when dealing with different legal systems, cultural broking and issues relating to the code of conduct such as impartiality and confidentiality.

The module is enhanced with the use of video materials, visits to courts and guest speakers.

Learning outcomes

By the time students complete the module they would have developed the ability to:

LO1. Apply their knowledge of Public Service Interpreting competently in its various forms, understand the interpreting process,  and reflect on the mechanisms which underlie it;
LO2. Interpret competently in a chosen context of Public Service Interpreting;

LO3. Recognise and reflect on the problems raised in the interpreting (transfer) process and be able to justify their occurrence;

LO4. Set up interpreting strategies, procedures and techniques to solve such problems and be able to use them competently;

LO5. Perform interpreting with particular attention paid to context, register and speakers' attitude and develop a critical appreciation of their role in the decisions and choices made during the interpreting process;

LO6. Conduct effective and sustained communication throughout the interpreting act and take appropriate action if and when communication breaks down,

LO7. Perform interpreting work taking into account the sensitive nature of public service interpreting and act in accordance with client etiquette and the interpreter's Code of Practice;
LO8. Apply their knowledge of the legal aspect of Public Service Interpreting competently and make appropriate use of the Professional Code of Practice and client etiquette.

Assessment strategy

Students knowledge of Public Service Interpreting for the legal system, their understanding of the interpreting process and their ability to identify and reflect on the problems raised and the solutions found to solve them are assessed through two exams in which students demonstrate their practical interpreting skills in the legal field.

Students critical knowledge of the legal aspect of Public Service Interpreting, their understanding of the sensitive nature of this particular mode of interpreting and their ability to deal with such sensitive situations according to the professional code of practice and client etiquette are assessed through a 2,000 comparative analysis of the such aspects applied to the different areas of Public Service Interpreting examined in the module.

Students who pass the module with 60% and over will also be granted the interpreting and sight translations tasks of the Diploma of Public Service Interpreting (Health option) delivered by the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

Bibliography

Barsky, R. (1996) "The Interpreter as Intercultural Agent in Convention Refugee Hearings," The Translator: Studies Intercultural Communication  2 (1): 45-63.
Berk-Segson, S. (1990) “The Bilingual Courtroom: Court Interpreters in the Judicial Process”. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.
_____________ ( 2000) "Interpreting for the Police: Issues in the Pre-Trial Phases of the Judicial Process," Forensic Linguistics: The International Journal of Speech, Language and Law 7(1): 213-38.
Carr, R. Rober, A. Dufour and D.Steyn (eds)  (1997) “The Critical Link: Interpreters”.
Colin, J. and Morris, R. (1996) “Interpreters and the Legal System”, Winchester: in The Community, Amsterdam: John  Benjamins.
Corsellis, A. (2008) “Public Service Interpreting, the first steps”, Basingstokes. Palgrave Macmillan
Edwards, A.B. (1995) “The Practice of Court Interpreting”, Amsterdam: Benjamins.
John Gentile, A. [et al.] (1996) “Liaison Interpreting, a Handbook”, Melbourne: Melbourne University Press.
Gonzalez, R.D., Vasquez, V.F. and Mikkelson, H. (1991) “Fundamentals of Court Interpreting: Theory, Policy and Practice”, Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press.
Hale, S.B. (2007) “Community Interpreting”, Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan
Kaufert, J. M and Putsch, R.W. (1997) "Communication through Interpreters in Healthcare: Ethical Dilemmas Arising from Differences in Class, Culture, Language and Power, " Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (1): 71-87.
Laster, K. and Taylor, V. (1994) “Interpreters and the Legal System”, New South Wales: The Federation Press.
Mikkelson, H. (2000) “Introduction to Court Interpreting”, Manchester: St Jerome. Waterside Press.
MIMIA (1996) “Medical Interpreting Standards of Practice” Boston, Massachusetts: Massachusetts Medical Interpreters Association, Education Development of Law, Lancaster University.

Websites:
National register for Public Service Interpreting: http://www.nrpsi.co.uk/ (Consulted on 07.07.2011)
      World health organisation: http://www.who.int/en/ (Consulted on 07.07.2011)